Three-Gaited American Saddlebred Horses

Three-Gaited American Saddlebred Horses pic

Three-Gaited American Saddlebred Horses
Image: horsechannel.com

Media production professional Mary Phillipa Sledge has served as an art department coordinator, set decoration assistant, and consultant on a variety of notable movies filmed in the United States. A recipient of USA Film Festival, CLIO, and Matrix Awards, Mary Phillipa Sledge has worked as an executive producer through the Memphis, Tennessee company SledgePro Media since 2011.

An avid equestrian, Ms. Sledge competed in the hunter jumper class in Tennessee as a teenager, and went on to win numerous three-gaited world championships.

Three-gaited championships showcase American Saddlebred horses. This breed of horse is a cross between the so-called “American horse” of the 18th century (used for both driving and riding) and Arabian and Morgan breeds. American Saddlebreds are generally 15 hands to 17 hands high and can be any color, though chestnut, black, and bay are most common. They are known for their high show quality.

Saddlebreds are required to be beautiful and elegant, possessing the arched neck that is a familiar sight in show horses. Three-gaited horses are trained to trot and canter at an easy pace with each hoof striking the ground separately. The slower pace is what sets three-gaited horses apart from five-gaited horses, which are evaluated on power and strength.

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About maryphillipasledge

Phillipa Sledge - Community Service Advocate
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